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Saturday, May 24, 2008

Succulent plants and a new book!

Here are a couple of shots of two plants in my tires. This one is Crassula pagoda, and I love how it turns red around the edges, as so many of the succulents do, in full sun. I have a fondness for crassula anyway, the way they build upon themselves! I'm glad this one seems to be happy in it's location, and with it's watering schedule!

Here is a growing specimen of Mammilaria gracilis fragilis, and I found this little tanish colored firm pod-like thing growing on it...I hope it will open to a flower! It could...it would be this plants first time flowering for me, so I am unsure of what to expect. If and when it does, I hope I catch it so I can take a picture to share!

And, here is my latest new OLD book! It was published in 1977, by George Ashley. The drawings inside are by Maggie Baylis, and are very detailed pen and inks. The author has a wonderful sense of humor, and came from a cactus and succulent dominated home (his Mom loved them). He covers every detail about these plants and their care, and the ink drawings are really great. I would have to say this is a really fun and informative book...one that I have REALLY enjoyed picking up over and over, in even a few short weeks! I adore all of my older succulent books (my collection is growing)...there is just something about them that I enjoy.

11 comments:

Cindy said...

I like that title.

That pod-like thing? I think it's a seed pod. That's my theory and I'm sticking with it.

Julie said...

Do I just wait till it dries up and then remove the seed pod...if it is, I would love to try and propogate these plants...they are just so sweet and pretty with their white stars!!! I hope it is a seed pod!!!

Cindy said...

I don't know. I have a Christmas cactus with a seed pod that's almost a year old. What do all your cactus books tell you?

Claude said...

That's definitely a seed pod... the blooms are very small and white. They usually bloom during the winter...

Most mam pods you leave them on until they start to dry out, you want them over-ripe... then scrape the seeds from the flesh. But M. gracillis is usually just propogated from cuttings.

Luther said...

Yes, it is a seedpod (from last summer's flower). Wait until it shrivels up and then you can harvest the seeds inside. Have fun.

Julie said...

Thanks all...I must have completely missed the blooming! Oh rats! I will watch the pod and take it off when it is all dry, and see what I have in there! I guess it would be much easier just to whack a ball off and stick it in the dirt. I just knda wanted to start some plants from seeds...wonder what the best seeds to try would be. I will have a look through all my books and see what they say also!

My LIttle Family: said...

Julie if you open it before planting, please be sure to le tus see a photo of the seeds. I don't believe I have ever had a succulent go to seed for me. But then again, I am a compulsive deadheader so they don't stand a chance.

vickie

Julie said...

I will Vickie! I am so excited now that I might be able to start some new plants this way...it will be a lot of fun to watch and see what happens! This is my first seed pod, ever!!!

No Rain said...

Seed pod for sure. Claude is right about waiting until they start to dry out. Taking off the little clumps (offsets) is a far easier method of propagation. I see plenty of offsets for you to choose from.
Aiyana

Teri C said...

Those red edges are beautiful! And your new 'old' book sounds great.

kathy said...

That looks like a wonderful book for a succulent lover to own.